Glebe Cottage, High Blantyre

Glebe Cottage was a former, substantial double villa dating from between 1875 and 1879 located on Craigmuir Road immediately adjacent to the High Blantyre Station.

The land was owned by the church, in particular with Rev. Stewart Wright noted as being the owner in the Valuation 1875 roll, which indicated “Glebe Land” with no indication of the villa at that time. It is known even earlier in 1865, Mr William Downie and Mr Russell of Burnbrae owned parts of the Glebe Land.

It may have initially been one large detached home and perhaps good business sense to for the single property to be divided into smaller properties. Dr Grant still lived there in 1881 with his family, however by then, it was three separate terraced houses. Two were five apartments the other was a two apartment. Robert Pollock was a Contractor there in 1879 his wife Agnes still living there in 1885 who also owned one of the 3 homes at that time. The other 2 homes were owned by R. C McCallum, based at 69 Union Street Glasgow who was letting out his homes. Mr Walker, a sawmiller and Mr Ramsay a contractor were the occupants in 1885, likely working next door at the sawmill. It would appear to have had an outside toilet on the southern side.

By the early 1890’s, the homes saw further subdivision and by 1895, it was 4 homes. John Young, Veterinary Surgeon, lived there in 1894 and John Hall, a clerk. Charles Reid (a brakesman) and Agnes Pollock were living there, 2 of the homes now in ownership of the trustees of R.C McCallum.

By 1905 only John Hall and Robert Pollock were living there indicating that a couple of the homes may have been unfit or they have been pieced back to being larger, but fewer homes.

In 1915, Robert and John Hall occupied the only 2 inhabited homes. On 9th March 1917, Isabella Fotheringham died at Glebe Cottage, the daughter of William and Ann Fotheringham. John Hall may have needed some help, when in July 1916 and in May 1918, adverts in the Hamilton Adveriser asked for a cleaner about aged 16 for “Hall” at Glebe Cottage, High Blantyre, noting the girl would be permitted to sleep “at home.” By 1920 John Hall and Allan Jack were occupiers, who were still there in 1925.

Margaret McKenzie (the Minister’s wife) in reminiscing about her days in Blantyre, remembered the ‘Glebe Cottage’ as being on the “Brickie” (Craigmuir Road), and it had a paper storage building right next to it (disused sawmill). The McKenzies lived there from 1934 till 1951, partly due to the deteriorated condition of the Manse House nearby. The Glebe Cottage(s) were demolished sometime between 1951 and 1963.

A modern detached house named “The Glebe” is now on this site. Today, it has white roughcast, solar panels and decking. It is best seen behind the church, through the trees on the slipway leading from the A725 Expressway on to Douglas Street.

On social media:

Janet Cochrane My uncle and aunt Joe and Jean McCaskie nee Marshall lived there in the 1950s they had five apartments also living in separate parts were Sammy and Mary Berry nee Baird my mother’s cousin and ? Simpson and his wife Nan Simpson nee Jack. Uncle Joe was the Beadle in the church he was also the church hallkeeper. I remember getting very small hard pears from the trees in the orchard he also kept bees there the bin lorries were also parked there in a shed at night. They moved to 9 Stonefield Place about 1957. The toilet was still outside at The Glebe at that time.

Bill Graham We got a puppy from Jean and Bill Weaver back in the early 70’s I remember the bungallow and the lovely view from it. One of the other puppies went to a Jim Patterson who’s father was the barber above Wilson’s shop on Main Street.

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